Interesting results

89 of 100 respondents indicate that they have a rather clear to very clear concept of public value, while 85 of 100 respondents are fairly concerned to very concerned that the public value in Germany receives too little consideration.

From an employer perspective, it should be noteworthy that 77 of 100 respondents are inclined to accept salary cuts in order to work for an organization that upholds public value. Given the consumer view, a public value orientation apparently also reaps benefits when it comes to shopping. 88 of 100 respondents indicate that they prefer products that benefit public value, even if it means having to spend more on them – 17 of 100 respondents, more than 10%.

25 interesting facts

#1 89 of 100 respondents indicate they have a fairly clear to very clear concept of public value

#2 Men, rather than women, indicate they have a clear concept of the meaning of public value.

#3 More retired persons and pensioners than respondents still studying (school, university) indicate that they have a clear concept of the meaning of public value.

#4 Respondents who often read local and regional newspapers indicate they have a clear concept of the meaning of public value.

#5 Respondents who indicate they have a clear concept of public value, report a higher life satisfaction, and experience what they generally do as more valuable and beneficial.

#6 85 of 100 respondents are fairly concerned to very concerned that public value receives too little consideration in Germany.

#7 Women and men are equally concerned that public value receives too little consideration in Germany.

#8 Public value concern increases with age.

#9 Respondents who are of the opinion that organizations generally take public value into account, report a higher life satisfaction, and experience what they generally do as more valuable and beneficial.

#10 77 of 100 respondents would rather work for organizations that uphold public value at a high level, even if it means earning less.

#11 More women than men would work for organizations that uphold public value at a high level, even if it means earning less.

#12 Respondents in management positions, rather than those not in management positions, would work for organizations that uphold public value at a high level, even if it means earning less.

#13 Respondents who often read “Bild” are more inclined to oppose the idea of working for organizations that uphold the public value at a high level, even if it means earning less.

#14 70 of 100 respondents strongly to very strongly disagree that organizations should disregard public value if their survival is at stake.

#15 More employed than unemployed persons agree that organizations should disregard public value if their survival is at stake.

#16 With increasing age, the public value orientation for an organization’s long-term success is rated as increasingly important.

#17 77 of 100 respondents indicate that their organizations make a fairly high to high contribution to public value.

#18 Respondents who evaluate the public value contribution of their organizations higher, report a higher life satisfaction, and experience what they generally do as more valuable and advantageous.

#19 Managers estimate their organization’s public value contribution higher.

#20 Employees whose managers, in their opinion, often support cooperation between employees and encourage them to work towards a common goal, estimate the public value contribution of their organizations higher.

#21 Employees who regard the conduct of their managers as exemplary, estimate their organization’s public value contribution higher.

#22 88 of 100 respondents would pay more for products and service providers that benefit public value.

#23 Respondents still studying (school, university) are, in comparison to working respondents, more willing to pay more for products and service providers that benefit public value.

#24 Respondents who often read “Bild” are more opposed to paying more for products and service providers that benefit public value.

#25 Respondents who often read the “Süddeutsche Zeitung,” the “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung,” or international newspapers, are more inclined to pay more for products and service providers that benefit public value.

Germans are thus concerned about public value, and are also willing to make financial compromises for public value. Therefore, public value is an important topic for organizations and companies. Confirmation of the own public value contribution and its confident communication are becoming an important argument in marketing, sales, and employer attractiveness. In addition, public value concerns play an (increasingly) important role regarding each organization’s long-term goal orientation.